Friday, December 23, 2011

Dub Xmas

As an aficionado of both programmed lights and bass, Roman fell out of his chair when I showed him this.



Thursday, December 15, 2011

datamining: music videos


If you read this, maybe you care to weigh in on a musical quandary...

Do music videos matter anymore?

I know it's a great art form, and there are lots of possibilities for a 3 minute window. But now that MTV is gone and youtube has picked up the torch, I cant help but think that the worth of the video has greatly decreased. It no longer makes the band.

First, everyone has AHDD. No one wants to sit through the whole video. They are likely doing something else while the video plays the music in the background. Are you doing that right now? Me too. Secondly, watching a music video on youtube is not the most viscerally pleasing experience. If you are there to appreciate the art, all of the ads and junk around the screen, kills the aesthetic. If you blow it up full screen, a lot of time the compression is bad, so it looks like a Nintendo game. Then of course, you might be watching on a iphone or itouch which is novel, but not really a way to appreciate film.

So should artists even really put that much effort and money into the video? Does the music video influence what listeners think about the music? When was the last time someone said, "Hey check out this song, you are going to love their video."

You have crappy songs with great videos and great songs with crappy videos and good songs with mediocre videos that the record company spent six figures on. Some bands are hugely popular, and they only have live videos on youtube, no high-dollar affair. What do you think??

In closing, I offer a mediocre song with an fantastic video: 0.54 seconds is crazy! I fell out of my chair the first time I watched it.


Wednesday, December 14, 2011

paging missy, your coffee is getting cold



For the next four days, I am working in an office.

Getting up in the morning, going in, getting on a big high powered computer (no offense laptop), fricking with employees, drinking tea and eating snacks. I've never worked with other artists at a design firm, I dont think I could handle the computer time, but this is a fun little break from the norm.

V.K. Rees & Coffee

V.K Rees photography

This looks like the best cup of coffee ever.
I'm going to pretend she put whole milk straight from the cow in there rather than soy milk.
Won't get started down that road, don't worry.

I think I've found my hero of inanimate object photography - Vanessa Rees.
She seems really cool too; on her site, she gives advice for aspiring photographers.
Because if you are that good you can tell people what F-stop you used and not freak out.
Protect the secrets of your skill at all costs! Maybe I shouldn't laugh, perhaps there's some legitimacy in "protecting the secrets of your craft," maybe I'm too much of a collectivist. Who knows.  

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

music of the minute

Andrew Bird
He has been honing his craft for a while (which is very evident). I'm surprised he's only now showing up on my radar. His compositions are so beautiful. I personally think musicians should pluck their violins more. 



 Tenuousness
 Effigy

tuesday

Hello, blog. How are you today? I'm doing fairly well, thank you. Just wondering where our second day of rain is. The weather man told us we would get two days of rain, which is a big deal for us parched Angelenos. Yesterday was perfect. I sat next to my big window and drew all day with the rain falling outside; it was magical.
I'm pretty happy that I get to draw my favorite things for this current project I'm working on. That would be Maps!

I had an "emergency" trip to NYC last week and started this incredible book on the plane - The Fourth Part of the World, by Toby Lester. All those pieces of Medieval history that seem so vague and were never really delved into in school (Marco Polo, Amerigo Vespucci, the Black Plague, Genghis Khan, etc), this book weaves them all together through the story of maps.

Lester started the investigation and book when a map from 1507 sold for more than the US Declaration of Independence at an auction. What was the map? The Waldseemuller Map, the first map of the entire world including the continents of North and South America, and the first map to name America (sorry Columbus, snooze you lose).

Friday, December 2, 2011


Living out my dreams of being a cartographer today.